Posts Tagged ‘tour’

Art & Nature Festival Scheduled for Saturday, June 11

Posted on: June 8th, 2016 by 89and52 No Comments

The Surry Arts Council, Minglewood Nature Preserve, and the Mount Airy Photography Club are joining  to provide free art and nature experiences for all ages on Saturday and Sunday June 11th.

Headlining the festival will be award winning nature photographer. Photographing in the Smokies since 1975 has afforded him limitless opportunities to observe and record the flora, fauna, and scenery of the region. More than 7,000 of his photos have been published. His work has appeared in Audubon Society Calendars, BBC Wildlife, Defenders of Wildlife, National Geographic, Nature Conservancy, and many others. He had three front covers in a row on Field & Stream which was a first in Field & Stream’s history. He also authored Great Smoky Mountains Wildlife Portfolio, and co-authored Great Smoky Mountains Wonder & Light and Ultimate Guide to Digital Nature Photography.

Events at the Andy Griffith Playhouse, 218 Rockford Street, will begin at 10:00 am when beekeeper and storyteller Vicky Town will present a program and craft, Bee’s Knees, for families and children of all ages in the Andy Griffith Museum Theatre. At the same time, Kayla Ellis will lead a Critter Painting class in the Photo Gallery on the lower level of the Andy Griffith Playhouse. Another painting class will follow this one at noon. Both classes are limited in size and are on a first come first serve basis . The music tent will be located in front of the Andy Griffith Playhouse. Jim Vipperman will offer hands on experiences with guitars and fiddles from 11:30 am-1:00 pm. At 1:00 pm, Peter Holland will take over the tent with interactive music and storytelling for all ages. At 1:30 pm on the lawn of the Andy Griffith Playhouse, Heather Elliott will gather children and adults for a yoga and nature experience. No prior knowledge of yoga is required. At 1:30 pm also, guests of all ages may gather under the portico of the Andy Griffith Playhouse to begin a garden tour of the grounds with master gardener, Ginny Adams. At 2:00 pm, The Andy Griffith Show fans can gather in the Andy Griffith Museum Theatre for a presentation by author and professor, Neal Brower. Professor Brower’s presentation will feature the episode The Big House. John Floyd, author and comedian, will be in the Andy Griffith Museum throughout the day with his new children’s book The Flower Lady.

The Sweet Basil food truck will be on hand at the Andy Griffith Playhouse on Saturday from 11:00 am until 2:00 pm.

At 3:30 pm at the Historic Earle Theatre, 142 North Main Street, the Mount Airy Photography Club will host award winning nature photographer, Bill Lea. His presentation The Wonder & Art of the Black Bear is free of charge and open to all ages. This presentation is followed by a Nature Photography Workshop at 5:00 pm for photographers of all levels.

At 7:00 pm, the Disney movie A Bug’s Life, rated G, will be shown free of charge at the Historic Earle Theatre.

Minglewood Nature Preserve, 238 Minglewood Road, Westfield, is an outdoor learning center whose mission is to educate the community about sustainable food production and proper environmental stewardship. Minglewood is hosting free events on Saturday from 10:00 am until 3:00 pm. Events include art and nature crafts and nature walks. Designated areas at Minglewood will offer children opportunities to create artwork from nature.

On Sunday, June 12, from 1:00-4:00 pm, Minglewood Nature Preserve will offer free art and nature events including a scavenger hunt. During the scavenger hunt, families will hike in the woods while using cell phone photography to collect items spied from the list. At 5:00 pm on Sunday, a Sunday Supper with chef Chris Wishart will be held (reservations required, call 336-351-2945, $75 per person). Visit the website www.minglewoodpreserve.org to find out more about arts activities, educational opportunities, and farm to table suppers, year round.

On Sunday, the Disney movie, A Bug’s Life, rated G, will be shown free of charge at the Historic Earle Theatre at 4:00 pm and 7:00 pm.

For more information, call Melissa Sumner at the Surry Arts Council at 336-786-7998 or Margie Imus at Minglewood Nature Preserve at 336-351-2945.

The Surry Arts Council Art and Nature Festival is funded in part by the Cindi and Andy Griffith Endowment and a grant from the Mount Airy Rotary Club. The photography presentation and workshop and the activities at Minglewood Nature Preserve are funded in part by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts.

LuRosa Atkins Manor Tour Home

Posted on: September 28th, 2015 by 89and52 No Comments

Tour LuRosa Atkins Manor a historic home built over 160 years ago. This Victorian farm house was originally built by the Jones’ family local residents of Surry County. Ed and April Atkins purchased the home in 2002. They began renovations immediately while at the same time maintaining the Victorian Era in every room including the original flooring in several rooms, the staircase, the parlor which was added in 1929, and the front foyer. After completing the renovations the Atkins’ decided to share their home with the public, by giving tours. Attractions include the doll room with over 55 dolls, an African Art room, a Western room containing John Wayne relics and Calvary swords. The antiques in the home have been collected over the past 30 years. These antiques include tea sets, glassware, furniture, 18th century tableware, and numerous collectibles. Also, there is an Oriental room with Nippon tea sets, oriental paintings from Japan and China and a carved ornate settee.

Mr. Atkins has been a stained glass artist for over 60 years. He has designed, built and installed 10 stained glass windows and the entire surface of the kitchen counter tops. One example is a hand-painted, three-dimensional, 7 ft by 4 ft stained glass window of the Canterbury Tales.

As Ed and April open their home and hearts to you, experience the feeling of stepping back into another time and place.

Tour Hours: Wednesday-Saturday 11am-5pm

Closed: December 20th-First Wednesday in April

Admission is $8 per person (Groups of 6 or more: $5 per person. Children ages 6 and under: Free admission)

Call 336-786-9122 for more information.
Directions:
Traveling south on Hwy 601/Rockford Street: Turn right on Forrest Drive. Go to Stop Sign and take a RIGHT. Home is 3rd house on left.
Traveling on West Pine Street/Hwy 89 – Turn at Hardee’s onto South Franklin Road. Home will be on the right, about 2 miles. If you reach Forrest Drive, you have gone too far.

Gertrude Smith House

Posted on: January 8th, 2014 by 89and52 No Comments

The historic Gertrude Smith House was built by merchant and landowner Jefferson Davis Smith around the turn of the century.  This Victorian-style home contains period furnishings and is listed on National Register of Historic Places. Open Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., April-December. There is no admission charge.

Jefferson Davis Smith was a local merchant and landowner who operated a general store, several farms, and numerous rental properties. After his death in the 1930s, his daughter Gertrude moved back to the Smith family home and assumed management of the family businesses. Gertrude was an interior decorator who was educated at Parson’s School of Design in New York City and was employeed by two prestigious NYC decorating firms. She used her decorating talents when she moved back to Mount Airy by updating and enlargming her childhood home and filling it with beautiful art and antiques. She continued her career in Mount Airy, decorating many of the interiors of the homes in the area. Gertrude’s brother, Dr. Robert Smith, collected much of the artwork in his world travels, including serving during World War II.
Gertrude was also involved in historic preservation locally and was one of the charter members of the Mount Airy Restoration Foundation. It was her passion for preservation that caused her to form the Gilmer-Smith Foundation, and the foundation’s board of directors oversees the perpetual care of the home. When Gertrude died in 1981, she willed that the home be left as a “living museum.”

A tour of the home gives visitors the feeling that the Smith family just walked out the back door moments earlier. Furnishings, accessories, and artwork are displayed just as they were when the Smith family lived there. Even the dining room table is set with Miss Gertrude’s china and crystal. Personal items are placed throughout the home for all who come to visit to appreciate, relish, and enjoy.

The beautiful yard contains trees and shrubs planted decades ago. Giant oak and ash trees, along with fruit and nut trees, redbuds, and dogwoods, are among the original plantings. Vintage shrubs such as forsythia, scotchbroom, spirea, lilac, and winter honeysuckle are woven throughout the Victorian landscape.